All things new.

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The BMW used to be cool.  Now it’s just a car.

My wonderful nine-year-old comes out with some pretty sharp comments sometimes.  And I told him that this was one I was going to have to blog about.  Because he’s right.  We bought the car a year ago.  And it was, indeed, pretty cool.  Setting aside the guilt I felt in buying such a snazzy car (though it only cost fractionally more than our Golf did more than a decade ago), it was an exciting purchase.  It’s pretty smart.  Bit more powerful than the Skoda.  It’s got some nifty features.  (It also tells lies – the phone button on the steering wheel seems not to be connected to any form of reality…)

But it’s just a car.

A year ago, it was an exciting purchase.  Now it’s just a car.  Sure, the amount of money we’ve spent repairing it in the last few weeks has put a bit of a dampener on things, but that’s not the only thing that’s made its initial excitement wane.  We’re just kinda used to it now.

Last week, I got a new mobile (cell phone, if you’re American!).  It’s pretty exciting.  I freaked myself out by using it to pay for something last week.  That was a New Thing.  And the camera seems to take moving pictures (no, I don’t mean a video camera – the photos have movement.  You’ll just have to trust me on this if you don’t have one).  Some games that didn’t work on the last one will work on this (and so far I’ve resisted the temptation to install them!).

But in time, the new mobile will stop being a new mobile and will just be a mobile.

I guess one of the first things people would want to do if they won the lottery would be to buy stuff.  “I’d really love to buy a new…”  New car?  New wardrobe?  New house?  New jet (to replace the rubbish one we owned before we won the lottery, obviously)?  You name it, we’d like a new one.  But what we can’t do is buy something that will stay new.  We can’t buy something that will stay fresh forever.  (I know, some processed cheese does have a remarkably long shelf-life, but that’s not my point).

In the last book of the Bible, Revelation, we’re told some stuff about the future.  A lot of it can be tricky to understand, but here’s a bit that’s pretty straightforward:

He who was seated on the throne said, ‘I am making everything new!’ Then he said, ‘Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.’

“He who was seated on the throne” refers to God, and He makes a declaration.  “I am making everything new!”  But this is something different to the ‘new’ we know.  (Yes, it’s a new new).  A little earlier in the Bible, in a letter that Peter wrote, we read this:

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead,  and into an inheritance that can never perish, spoil or fade.

You see, it’s a new new because it will never fade.  The BMW’s a year old (well, it’s a year older!).  The phone’s a week old and only going to get older and older.  But the ‘inheritance’ that Peter talks about in the little passage above won’t ever fade.  The shine will never rub off.  There will be no repairs needed.  It’ll be a new birth, and a living hope.

Delighting in a glory that doesn’t fade or grow old.  That’s something to look forward to!

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2 Responses to All things new.

  1. frmary66 says:

    And what about getting new while YOU/WE are getting old(er)… ? That’s 2 Corinthians 4:16 – and I’m clinging to it. (Go on – look it up.)

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